African Allies Series

African allies do exist. In this video-based documentary series, we meet prominent African thinkers, politicians, and culture makers as they share their personal journeys to allyship. From Doula, Cameroon to Nairobi, Kenya to the stages of the world, these household names demystify misconceptions around who supports LGBTIQ equality in Africa—and their reasons why. On a continent where powerful and visible allies are hard to find, the African Allies Series will present stories that inspire allies into action and expand room for the understanding of Queer African identities as anything but foreign.

Dr. Willy Munyoki Mutunga<br/><br/>Willy Munyoki Mutunga is a lawyer and a fighter for social justice in Kenya.  He was the first indigenous Kenyan to teach law at the University of Nairobi in the 1970s. While defending student rights and criticizing Kenya's government, he was detained on numerous occasions and finally exiled. When he returned to Kenya, he worked to reform civil society and in 2011, he became the Chief Justice of Kenya. Long misunderstood and seen as an outsider, today, Mutunga’s name is associated with ideals of tolerance, human rights, and democratic values.

Dr. Willy Munyoki Mutunga

Willy Munyoki Mutunga is a lawyer and a fighter for social justice in Kenya. He was the first indigenous Kenyan to teach law at the University of Nairobi in the 1970s. While defending student rights and criticizing Kenya's government, he was detained on numerous occasions and finally exiled. When he returned to Kenya, he worked to reform civil society and in 2011, he became the Chief Justice of Kenya. Long misunderstood and seen as an outsider, today, Mutunga’s name is associated with ideals of tolerance, human rights, and democratic values.

Seun Kuti<br/><br/>The last born son of the renowned Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti, Seun Kuti follows in his father’s footsteps as a brilliant Nigerian musician, a great singer and a firm believer in self-expression. By leading Fela's former band Egypt 80 and promoting the values of inclusion, Seun Kuti continues his father’s legacy. With a passion for social justice, in 2012, Seun Kuti participated actively in the Occupy Nigeria protests taking a stand against the policies of President Goodluck Jonathan.

Seun Kuti

The last born son of the renowned Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti, Seun Kuti follows in his father’s footsteps as a brilliant Nigerian musician, a great singer and a firm believer in self-expression. By leading Fela's former band Egypt 80 and promoting the values of inclusion, Seun Kuti continues his father’s legacy. With a passion for social justice, in 2012, Seun Kuti participated actively in the Occupy Nigeria protests taking a stand against the policies of President Goodluck Jonathan.

Bishop Christopher Ssenyonjo<br/><br/>Christopher Senyonjo’s life is a story of transformation. He was a clergyman who was elevated to bishop in 1974. After his retirement, Ssenyonjo founded a community center as a safe place for the Ugandan LGBTQ+ community saying, “I did not know before, what I know now.” He works to provide housing and employment for those denied these basic rights because of their gender expression or sexuality. Barred from performing church services by the Church of Uganda, he has become one of the most important advocates for gay rights in his country.

Bishop Christopher Ssenyonjo

Christopher Senyonjo’s life is a story of transformation. He was a clergyman who was elevated to bishop in 1974. After his retirement, Ssenyonjo founded a community center as a safe place for the Ugandan LGBTQ+ community saying, “I did not know before, what I know now.” He works to provide housing and employment for those denied these basic rights because of their gender expression or sexuality. Barred from performing church services by the Church of Uganda, he has become one of the most important advocates for gay rights in his country.

Dr. Alice Nkom<br/><br/>Dr. Alice Nkom is a living legend. In 1969 at the age of 24, she became Cameroon’s first female attorney, breaking barriers for many women in the region. She worked to defend a variety of people, including young victims of police violence, but she has devoted her practice to defending people accused of homosexuality in Cameroon. Founder of the Association for the Defence of Homosexuality in 2003, she refuses to close her practice. “Someone has to do it”, she says.

Dr. Alice Nkom

Dr. Alice Nkom is a living legend. In 1969 at the age of 24, she became Cameroon’s first female attorney, breaking barriers for many women in the region. She worked to defend a variety of people, including young victims of police violence, but she has devoted her practice to defending people accused of homosexuality in Cameroon. Founder of the Association for the Defence of Homosexuality in 2003, she refuses to close her practice. “Someone has to do it”, she says.